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Tracy Spicer’s trick when pressure is too high

After suffering from burnout and depression for several tough years, the writer Tracy Spicer at the broadcaster has developed a unique coping mechanism for when life becomes stressful.

Life is stressful for author and broadcast journalist Tracey Spicer Recently, she visualizes the cup. When she sees it fill up too much, she does something to reduce the pressure she feels.

“It doesn’t matter if you use public transport instead of driving, gardening, watching comedy, taking a bath, going out and looking at the trees,” says Spicer. Stellar rumen..

“I really know what I mean by not overflowing my cup.”

This is a necessary protection technology for women who have spent much of the last 15 years campaigning, struggling and advocating on their behalf.

Spicer she is at the forefront of Australia’s response to the #MeToo movement, publicly calling for discrimination in the workplace, writing books that distort the television industry, and highlighting the madness of women’s care in biral TEDx talks. I used my profile to make sure I could hear the woman’s story.

Her work saw her appointed as a member of the Order of Australia, but it burned her so much that she was diagnosed with a major depressive disorder.

Former Network 10 newsreader describes herself as a lifelong optimist, but she experiences compensatory trauma due to the effects of hearing hundreds of stories from survivors of sexual assault. Did.

She came out of a time when she wasn’t in the limelight, so she doesn’t want to focus on her suffering, except that she has a strategy to manage her suffering.

“It was a time when I learned to focus on mental health,” she says.

“My dad experienced severe depression and tried to commit suicide once, but I had never experienced it. [depression].. “

She keeps in mind that many people are suffering from a pandemic, and while she is successful thanks to therapy, meditation, exercise and yoga, she is still worried about those who are struggling.

“I’ve experienced depression myself, and I really feel the people who live with it every day. It’s best to prioritize mental health. Everything else has to be delayed.”

As a result, the 54-year-old Spicer is taking a more cautious and gentle pace on his next project. This is a book that examines biases within artificial intelligence, due out in 2023.

With working title Sex bot, This book is part of her mission to bring more girls and women into their STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) careers and prevent gender and racism from being incorporated into new technologies. Is forming.

“You talk to people all over the world, but there are three major issues that will shape the world in the next 50 to 100 years: climate change, pandemics, and artificial intelligence. [AI], “She says.

“We’re talking about the first two, but not here in Australia close enough to talk about the third. This is a bit like the way we used to look at climate change. Climate change is so great that we don’t really want to face it. “

Broadcasters see her work as a form of “future feminism” and are designed to start conversations before existing stereotypes and discrimination are replicated in robots and algorithms.

She cites studies used by virtual assistants such as Siri, Alexa, and Google Home for men to monitor, harass, and control their partners at home. Meanwhile, algorithms that determine who has access to ventilators in US hospitals have been shown to favor wealthy whites. Patience.

Spicer said the issue was “catastrophic” until he began interviewing global experts who confirmed that artificial intelligence could set us back in terms of sexism and equality. He says he is concerned.

“I’m not an IT or AI expert, but what I can do as a journalist is to express complex concepts in simple terms, so that as a consumer, before putting pressure on tech giants and governments. And everyone will have access to the tool. It’s late, “she says.

This version of the book has been modified for teachers, students and parents to highlight gender imbalances in STEM careers. More than one-third of higher-educated men are studying STEM-related qualifications, as Dr. Cathy Foley, Australia’s chief scientist, revealed in a recent speech.

Statistics are worrisome about Spicers. “I am looking to the future with fear and frustration, thinking that all these great benefits achieved on the road to equality can be wasted.”

Presenters say their two children, Taj (16) and Grace (15), are determined to run through adolescence and tackle the issue of social justice.

“I think everyone has a desire to make the world a better place. With a pandemic, we see the best and the worst of the people, and the best is that it’s all To unleash the empathy of the people. “

Twitter’s call to victims of sexual harassment left her traumatized and eventually separated her from NOW Australia, a support organization she founded, but Spicer is a battle for equality among many young women. Is encouraged to continue.

“It’s great that people of my generation have that kind of faith in that generation,” she says. Stellar rumen.. “They will definitely raise the flag and make an incredible leap towards equality in the coming decades.”

Spicer, who has moved from the center stage to a bystander of such issues, says he is happy to raise a teenager and spend more time with his 20-year-old husband, cameraman Jason Thompson.

Due to the blockade, the couple had to reduce the planned anniversary celebration to a walk in the rain, but she thanked the man she called the “absolute rock.” doing. If the pandemic made her aware of how meaningful her family was to her, it would also ease her pace.

“I’m in my mid-50s now. I’m happy to slow down a bit and work only three or four days a week,” she says.

“I’m lucky to be in that position, and hopefully I can continue to achieve that balance. As the great Martin Luther King Jr. said,” The arc of the moral universe is long. But it’s crooked towards justice. “It was always the quote I loved. ”

Tracy Spicer’s trick when pressure is too high

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