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Search for Cleo Smith: Tourists abandon the blowhole campsite where the girl disappeared

Barking winds, rocky terrain, and thundering soundtracks—these are the eerie situations that four-year-old Cleo Smith would have faced when he disappeared from his family’s tent at midnight.

Early on October 16th, the girl whose face would soon become one of WA’s most famous is believed to have been pulled from the side of her mother and stepfather.

A popular blowhole campsite, usually crowded with enthusiastic tourists, resembled a ghost town just a week later, overcoming the tranquility of the wind alone.

Cleo was last seen at 1:30 am when her mother Erie woke up to drink water, but when her mother Erie woke up again at 6:30 am, a young man with hazel eyes yes. lost.

The Western Australian spent early Saturday morning, just seven days after Cleo went missing, at the campsite where she was last seen.

Camera iconMissing girl Cleo Smith, 4. credit: Facebook / Ellie Smith
Missing girl Cleo Smith, left.
Camera iconMissing girl Cleo Smith, left. credit: Dominique Visual/Dominique Visual
A drone shot of a blowhole campsite.
Camera iconA drone shot of a blowhole campsite. credit: WA police/supply

Standing there at 1:30 am, I couldn’t shake my anxiety. The site was almost completely unmanned, except for one car parked in the cabin on the south side of the campsite.

A fun holiday hotspot during the day would have resembled a thrilling movie set, as the devastated hut stood eerily in the dark.

Rocky terrain, not to mention when it’s very dark, should be carefully navigated at best. While negotiating the loose rocks and potholes on the bumpy road, we realized that we always had to keep an eye on where we were heading.

Moving safely will only be more difficult if you step into the bushes.

It’s hard to imagine how a little girl could manage such a feat on her own, especially if she had a sleeping bag.

Overnight at the Blowhall campsite near Carnerbon.
Camera iconOvernight at the Blowhall campsite near Carnerbon. credit: Jackson Barrett/Banbury Herald
Blowhole campsite near Carnerbon when the sun began to rise this morning.
Camera iconBlowhole campsite near Carnerbon when the sun began to rise this morning. credit: Irish Delaney/Southwest Times

Our night was illuminated by an occasional beam from a nearby lighthouse and almost a full moon.

The moon set at 6:42 am, well after sunrise. But Cleo wouldn’t have been so lucky. According to Geoscience Australia, at 1:30 am on October 16th, the moon was in the dark with a visibility of about 75% before it set at 2:38 am.

The rest of the night at the campsite, all we heard was sharp winds, breaking waves, and cricket chirping.

A gust of up to 35 km / h was recorded at Carnarvon Airport at 4 am — I felt it struck at a coastal campsite.

The temperature dropped to 18 degrees Celsius at 6 am and the sensible temperature was 14 degrees Celsius, but it was easy to feel the cold even with jumpers and jeans.

Lastly, Little Cleo was seen wearing only pink coveralls. It would have given little resistance to howling winds and cool temperatures.

At sunrise at 5:45 am, we were able to leave safely, but for the Smiths, the question remains where Cleo is.

Search for Cleo Smith: Tourists abandon the blowhole campsite where the girl disappeared

Source link Search for Cleo Smith: Tourists abandon the blowhole campsite where the girl disappeared

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