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Male fertility is declining as male sperm counts are set to reach zero by 2045

Dr. Kate Mcllwaine, a fertility specialist at Genea, said in consultation with patients that many couples believe the problem lies in the female reproductive system.

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However, increasing research on the role of men in childbirth is gradually moving conversation away from women alone. Just a few weeks ago, New York-based environmental and reproductive epidemiologist Shanna Swan wrote to her that the news that sperm counts could reach zero in the west shocked the world. New book countdown According to current projections, sperm counts are set to reach zero in 2045.

It’s an explosive claim, 2017 systematic review We examined 185 studies based on semen samples from approximately 43,000 men from 1973 to 2011. Co-author Swan found that sperm quality and quantity have decreased by about 1-2% since the 1970s. By 2045 her claim will be zero.

And Some researchers He says this significant difference may be related to limited data (most of the 43,000 men analyzed came from the West), but nevertheless raises an important issue: What do we do about the plunging sperm counts in the Western world?

“Historically, there has been too much emphasis on female childbirth and infertility. This definitely turns out to be a 50-50 issue,” said Deputy Director and Senior Director of Reproductive Biology at the University of Melbourne. Associate Professor Mark Green, the instructor, said. ..

The ability of women to become pregnant Plunge After the age of 35, the decline in male fertility becomes more subtle, but it can have the same effect. Men over the age of 40 can still give birth, but Dr. Green says their offspring are much more likely to be in the autism spectrum or develop other neuropathy. I will.

“That is, there could be a woman in her twenties and a man in her forties. She is very fertile, but her child is much more likely to have problems than if her father was young,” he said. Says.

“There is a difference between a pregnancy and a healthy pregnancy. Fertilization of sperm does not mean that it does not affect the long-term health of the offspring.”

Aside from factors such as cultural changes to a small family, contraception, and rising costs for children, the “chemicals everywhere” in plastics, cosmetics, and pesticides that affect endocrine are hard to imagine. I will.

“Many people are unaware that the products they use in their daily lives contain chemicals called endocrine disruptors (EDCs), which can reduce a couple’s ability to give birth. “Professor Green says.

Common examples of EDC include children’s products, personal care products, bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates used in food containers, and flame retardants used in furniture and floor coverings.

“In general, men don’t talk about this as openly as women. I think this contributes to how difficult male infertility can be when working.”

But the worst chemicals – called PFAS – Professor Green says it is found not only in Teflon products, but also in the lining of pizza and popcorn boxes.

“They are called” eternal chemicals “because they are heat resistant and don’t break down easily,” he says.Studies show that about 95 percent of people EDC in the body And those who have a hard time imagining often have higher levels of some EDC.

Alfred’s psychiatrist blames women for seeing infertility through the lens of being pregnant, and the role of men is psychologically minimized. Men’s masculine and sexual abilities are often confused with their ability to conceive a woman. Monash University Jaya Shulk Kurkarni.

“A man can be very good as a lover, but he can be infertile, and two things are often confusing,” she says.

Professor Kurkarni makes people believe that a story about a man raising a child in old age- “I hear an anecdote that Picasso raises a child in his 70s” -is a major role for men in the process of childbirth. I point out.

David Alcock and his wife had been suffering from infertility for three years before starting IVF.

“In addition, women and children are surrounded together, and parenting and childbirth are considered women’s roles, so perhaps this is why men’s roles are not considered important,” she says.

David Alcock, a chef at Orange, New South Wales, noticed that sperm were moving slower than usual, but didn’t fully understand what that meant.

“I wasn’t really thinking about it, I wasn’t thinking about it at all, and I wasn’t considering the fact that I was having a problem at all,” he says. “No doubt, this is not what men think. It’s usually up to women.”

At the time, Alcock and his wife had failed to give birth for three years, and even after tests showed that sperm motility (sperm swimming speed) was reduced, the GP said it. I didn’t do much.

“Our doctor said it was okay and would continue to try naturally after the next round of testing,” says Allcock, 37.

Eventually they realized they were running out of time and the couple decided to try ICS II VF.

“Everything went well for the first time from the same batch. Now I have three children, five, three and eight months old, and my wife’s eldest son.”

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Alcock says he’s always happy with his masculinity, but he says he took “a little slack” in his rural town and had some offensive conversations. [about his own fertility]..

Dr. Kate McLewain sees similar feelings among her patients. “In general, men don’t talk about this as openly as women. I think this contributes to how difficult male infertility can be when working.

Allcock’s advice to other men with infertility problems is to seek help and advice as soon as possible. “You may be surprised at how easy it is to find and address a particular problem.”

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Male fertility is declining as male sperm counts are set to reach zero by 2045

Source link Male fertility is declining as male sperm counts are set to reach zero by 2045

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