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Independents in local elections, Liberal Party members running as community candidates

Liberal members are running independently under the banner of community tickets in the next parliamentary elections, without mentioning their website or promotional material that they hold Liberal membership. increase.

The New South Wales Liberal Party does not endorse candidates for some council areas such as North Sydney, Kiama, and Shoalhaven.

Local Liberal parties wishing to run for these councils are allowed to use Liberal Party signs under the rules of the Liberal Party and the Election Commission, even if they openly “identify” as Liberal Party. Not.

El Prevost, the first candidate to run for the North Sydney Council as an independent party, said she was a “proud Liberal Party member.”

North Sydney Candidate El Prevost.credit:ellefornorthsydney.com

“I’m liberal, but not approved in the North Sydney area,” she said. “Maybe I’m naive, but my understanding is that I’m independent because I’m not endorsed by the Liberal Party.”

Prevost’s ticket is called “Team El”. The website announces her as “Independence of the North Sydney Council” and does not mention her Liberal membership. Membership is disclosed in Mr. Prevost’s Candidate Nomination Form submitted under the subheading of the PDF document on the New South Wales Election Commission website.

“This is a really liberal area, so you should scream from the roof because you can get more votes,” she said.

Retired Navy officer Mark Crocsford is a member of the Liberal Party executives and members of the Liberal Party in New South Wales. However, his relationship with the Liberal Party is not mentioned in the promotional material for his conduct at the Kiama Council in the elections scheduled for December 4.

Mark Crocsford is running for the Kiama LGA election.

Mark Crocsford is running for the Kiama LGA election.credit:Johnny Barrett

Croxford is at the top of the Your Community Candidates ticket, which pledges to “form a council free from the political agenda of political parties.” The group’s website urges voters to “endanger councils affected by party politics,” stating that “party politics has no place in local governments.”

Croxford’s “Career” on the Your Community Candidates website describes his career as a lobbyist and senior ministerial adviser to the Howard administration, but his position as a national representative or member of the New South Wales Liberal Party executives. Not listed.

Membership is declared on his nomination form on the Election Commission’s website.

“I’m hiding in the open,” Croxford said. “I belong to the Liberal Party for federal and state politics. Personally, I don’t think there is room for party politics in local politics.”

He said he would always disclose his Liberal roots when he was talking to the members.

“I’m happy to say that I’m a liberal member, but I want to represent my community as a councilor,” he said.

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The Independent Municipal Declaration, produced by the North Sydney Independent Group, was signed by 56 candidates from the Lane Cove, North Sydney, Willoughby, Hunters Hill, and Georges River Councils.

Rod Simpson, co-convener of the North Sydney Independents Group, states that the intent of the declaration is “to give local governments some transparency.”

“It asks people what their political position is, and if they were. [a member of a political party] In the past, and whether they made political contributions or were staff, “says Simpson, a former environmental committee member of the Greater Sydney Commission. “It’s really hard for people to unravel this. We’re trying to bring it to the surface so that people can easily see what’s happening on Earth.”

The stated intent of the Declaration is to “distinguish” community-oriented independents “from” independents “belonging to political parties.” “Community-oriented independence” is defined as a candidate who “votes as an individual, not currently a member of a political party.”

The Shoalhaven Council claims that Serena Copley is independent on the basis of a ballot, but she is also a member of the Liberal Party, according to New South Wales Election Commission records.

Serena Copley is a candidate for the Shoalhaven City Council.

Serena Copley is a candidate for the Shoalhaven City Council.credit:Facebook / Serena Copley for Shoalhaven City Council

The same applies to other candidates for her tickets, Fred Campbell, Leonard White and Francoise Sikola.

Mr. Copley’s team is called the “Fresh Approach” and the promotional material does not mention the relationship with the Liberal Party.

Council candidates Fred Campbell OAM and Leonard White.

Council candidates Fred Campbell OAM and Leonard White.credit:Facebook / Serena Copley for Shoalhaven City Council

In response to the question from Sydney Morning HeraldMs. Copley said she has been a member of the Shoalhaven community for over 30 years.

“They know me and what I represent,” she said. “Because I run independently, I can represent my community, only my community. I can’t represent a party or its agenda.”

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Independents in local elections, Liberal Party members running as community candidates

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