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Here’s how a group of Muslim women in Melbourne are boosting vaccination in the community:

Their website contains links to vaccination appointments, and there are plans to open culturally sensitive mobile clinics in hotspot areas to increase vaccination intake.

Over 86% of Victorians have been vaccinated at least once, and over 61% have been fully vaccinated.

However, prices are lagging in areas with large multicultural communities where infectious diseases continue to proliferate.

The group acknowledges that the Islamic community is at risk of remaining vulnerable as the state reopens over the next few weeks.

“Family dynamics in the Islamic community, family size, and population densities in some of these areas show a clear step forward as cases increase and hospitalizations increase. Organizer Nelja Mohammad told SBS News.

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The first two clinics will run on October 29th and 30th in the Wyndham and Hume city councils and will be run by female doctors and nurses in a religiously appropriate way.

“We wanted it to be a safe space. We wanted it to be run by people who looked like them and clearly felt comfortable going forward,” Mohammad said. Said.

“We do not send you to places where some isolated clinics and environments are unfamiliar to you, especially if you already have hesitation.”

Behind-the-scenes photos of the SistaHub vaccination campaign.

sauce: Provided by: SistaHub


Mohammad said the SistaHub campaign, which highlights Muslim health care professionals, wants to “close the gap” between government information and the community.

She said it is becoming increasingly difficult for women in the community to access credible information from accurate sources.

Responding to previous outbreaks in marginalized communities also contributed to the lack of trust.

In the early weeks of Victoria’s 2020 outbreak, Melbourne Muslims were selected to play a role in spreading the virus in the early weeks of the second wave.

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“It’s really, really hard for women to really trust someone, not to mention the government,” Mohammad said.

“All consistent messages … unfortunately were perceived as a threat or with some agenda behind it.

“To overcome it all, it must come from people in the community.”

Mohammad and her family experienced the stigma first hand. Her children are enrolled at the University of Altakuwa, Victoria’s largest Islamic university, and are involved in multiple COVID-19 clusters.

“Even in a small community, it was very banished.”

Here’s how a group of Muslim women in Melbourne are boosting vaccination in the community:

Source link Here’s how a group of Muslim women in Melbourne are boosting vaccination in the community:

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