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Australian scientists are mapping seagrass to protect the Great Barrier Reef

“Seagrass meadows provide food and shelter for fish, crustaceans, dugongs and green turtles. They provide nutrient circulation, particle traps, removal of bacterial pathogens and are valuable marine carbon sinks,” said JCU. Researcher Catherine Collier said.

“But at the same time, they are vulnerable to many threats and often result from human activity that produces pollutants and deposits and can have catastrophic consequences,” Dr. Collier said. Stated.

Due to the size and complexity of marine habitats, sampled data can be less accurate for comparable terrestrial environments, Dr. Collier said.

Injecting the high cost of sampling seagrass meadows and large datasets, scientists need to blend this data through computer modeling to accurately show the basis for monitoring, trends, and management. bottom.

“We also showed that the structure, location and distribution of seagrass communities are the result of complex environmental interactions,” said Dr. Alexandra Carter.

“… includes depth, tidal exposure, latitude, current velocity, bottom light, percentage of mud in sediments, water species, water temperature, salt content, and wind speed.

“Our analysis supports spatial planning and can be used to design monitoring programs that represent the diversity of seagrass communities and help us understand the environmental risks to these habitats. If we wish, it is in the right direction. It’s a step. We will maintain a healthy environment for the future. “

This project is supported by funding from the Australian Government’s National Environmental Science Program.

Australian scientists are mapping seagrass to protect the Great Barrier Reef

Source link Australian scientists are mapping seagrass to protect the Great Barrier Reef

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