Sydney

Assisted suicide of spontaneous death: the last two words of a man’s agony

The woman explained the last painful words of her brother who suffered from cancer, saying that the law to legalize euthanasia in New South Wales is approaching a major milestone.

The state’s voluntary assisted suicide bill was expected to pass the Senate on Wednesday night after a majority of lawmakers expressed their support.

The MP was scheduled to discuss the bill at 7:30 pm and vote two hours later.

Supporter Kathy Barry told parliamentary reporters that her brother Tom “died for mercy” because assisted suicide was not available when he died of advanced facial cancer in 2020. Said.

Camera iconKathy Barry said her brother “died for mercy.” NCA NewsWire / Nikki Short credit: News Corp Australia
Thom Barry died of facial cancer in 2020. He was photographed in 2018 before the diagnosis.
Camera iconThom Barry died of facial cancer in 2020. He was photographed in 2017 before the diagnosis. credit: supply

“Tom died in the last few weeks of his life in search of mercy. He could only say two words. One was” help “and the other was” inhumane. ” She said.

“That’s why I’m here today because I can’t stand the idea that another person in New South Wales is experiencing that suffering.

“Tom was well on palliative care … but no matter how hard they tried, they couldn’t stop his terrible suffering.”

Thom Barry was diagnosed at the age of 69 and died six months later in February 2020.
Camera iconBarry was diagnosed at the age of 69 and died six months later in February 2020. credit: supply

If passed, the bill will align New South Wales with all other states in legalizing the voluntary euthanasia of people with incurable medical conditions with a survival time of less than 12 months. increase.

Opponents have expressed concern that if the bill is passed, people may feel forced to end their lives and argue that the state should not have the right to kill anyone. bottom.

Proponents argued that it would give people with terminal illness greater control over their own lives and deaths.

“There is a clear majority and the bill will be passed,” said Alex Greenwich, an independent MP who has been instrumental in submitting the bill.

“It’s not a problem, it’s a matter of time, and I call on my colleagues in the House of Councilors to make sure they work constructively with me and other colleagues to help pass this bill.”

If there are any amendments, they will be processed next Wednesday and the bill will be returned to the House of Representatives again, assuming it was agreed.

NSW State Parliament
Camera iconIndependent MP Alex Greenwich said the bill is likely to be passed. NCA NewsWire / Nikki Short credit: News Corp Australia

Once the bill is enacted, NSW Health will have 18 months to implement it. This means that those who are eligible for assisted suicide will not have access to the bill until the end of next year at the earliest.

Mr Greenwich urged lawmakers who oppose the bill not to submit “hostile amendments” to stall the passage of the bill.

“It’s not just the bill that they’re postponing. It’s not just the bill that they’re delaying. They’re prolonging people’s pain and suffering … they play with people’s lives and people’s death. I’m out, “he said.

A coalition of religious elderly caregivers said Wednesday that provisions should be put in place to allow staff to refuse to help homes that oppose death assistance implement it if the bill is passed. rice field.

“If voluntary assisted suicide is voluntary for the general public, all VAD schemes must be voluntary for clinical staff and healthcare professionals, and the organizations in which they work,” HammondCare, Anglicare. , A joint statement by Catholic Health Australia states.

“We ask (House of Councilors) not to create unnecessary divisions by allowing assisted suicide of the inhabitants as a prerequisite for providing elderly care in this condition.”

Assisted suicide of spontaneous death: the last two words of a man’s agony

Source link Assisted suicide of spontaneous death: the last two words of a man’s agony

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