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According to inquiries, making large vehicles more affordable will remove old trucks off the road and reduce the risk of traffic safety.Area news

News, local news, truck safety, trucks, heavy vehicles, traffic safety, safety regulations

Under drastic recommendations for improving the safety of the heavy-duty vehicle sector, research is being sought on how to build new trucks that offer the latest safety features at a more affordable price. Reform is one of those recommended by the Federal Road Safety Review Board, and a recent campaign by the Australian Community Media (ACM) highlights many of the major safety issues in this sector. In the same week that the ACM campaign took place in early March, the federal government finally moved to two major heavy-duty vehicle safety obligations. Advanced emergency braking (AEB) and electronic stability control (ESC). Upon completion, implementation in Australia will be 10 years after the same regulations were mandated in Europe. New technology can be retrofitted to many older trucks, but at a considerable cost. As a result, the Joint Road Safety Selection Committee has an option for the federal government to work with state and territory governments to “encourage the purchase of newer, safer heavy vehicles and increase their affordability. I want to investigate. ” According to the Heavy Vehicle Industry Association, more than 70,000 trucks on Australian roads are 15 to 22 years old. Purchase costs are a major impediment to fleet sales, as basic new heavy prime movers with state-of-the-art safety equipment can cost more than $ 130,000. Chairman and former Federal Transport Minister Darren Chester admitted that many old trucks are being driven modestly or seasonally by owners, but still have higher collisions or rollovers than more modern vehicles. I agree that I have shown the risk of. The Commission also identified that, as is common to all transportation sectors, there is not enough data to help inform decisions on how to deal with heavy vehicle collisions. As a result, the Commission wants a better mechanism developed to identify drivers with disabilities in heavy vehicle collisions, along with matching relevant details such as vehicle type and age. Pooling data in a standardized way is a major problem across states and regions. No agreement has yet been reached on how to collect serious injury data. ACM’s Break Legacy Campaign is a swift of the latest two safety obligations, with a four-year-old Canberra boy Blake Corny being hit by a dump truck while a family SUV was parked at a traffic light on the Monaro Highway in 2018. Encouraged the reform of large-scale heavy vehicles, including rear-end collisions. The AEB system detects the possibility of a forward collision, alerts the driver and automatically brakes if the driver does not respond. The ESC system detects the risk of a rollover and automatically decelerates the vehicle accordingly. Starting November 1st next year, all new heavy vehicles will be required to be equipped with both as standard as part of Australian Design Rules 35/07 and 97/00. For existing new models, delegation will be extended until 2025. Todd Hacking, CEO of the Heavy Vehicle Industry Association, welcomed the federal move, but heavy vehicle buyers should not wait for the delegation to take effect. “Recommended for anyone considering buying a new truck or trailer to put the safety of all road users first. Even with the option to add the latest safety technology to the vehicle. Don’t compromise, “he said. Break’s Legacy:

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According to inquiries, making large vehicles more affordable will remove old trucks off the road and reduce the risk of traffic safety.Area news

Source link According to inquiries, making large vehicles more affordable will remove old trucks off the road and reduce the risk of traffic safety.Area news

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